Swiss Chard Wonderfulness

IMG_7312My green thumb has always had a soft spot for Swiss chard. Forever, I grew luscious fields of these crinkly leafed greens, their yellow, red, pink or orange stalks sparkling like bright lights against the black soil.

Forever, that is, in my dreams!

IMG_7318For two wretched years, I watched Swiss chard not grow on my balcony garden. No matter how much I prayed when I tucked the seeds into the soil… No matter how sweet my gaze when I sprinkled water upon the seedlings… No matter, no matter, all I grew were stunted little dwarfs covered in a mysterious mildew.

Bleck.

So it came as a marvel that the veggie gods sang above my balcony this year and blessed me with a container so full of chard, I can cook at least two or three meals from the bounty.

IMG_7317Swiss chard tastes like spinach but differs slightly in the texture department. While spinach leaves cook down into a soft mass, one-tenth the original size, chard is more sturdy – but not nearly as tough as kale. Chard with red stalks will bleed crimson, just like its close cousin the beet green. Their earthy flavours bear similarity, too.

IMG_7320That’s why it doesn’t hurt to sweeten up a bunch in the pan. Toss in just a handful of dried apricots, raisins or currants and it will add currency to this green when serving it to Green Naysayers. Vidalia onions from Georgia are a spectacular addition, too. And toasting just a tablespoon of pine nuts in a dry frying pan at high for a couple of minutes adds the final finish to a recipe worth celebrating the harvest with.

IMG_7323

Swiss chard with apricots and pine nuts

2 tbsp                                     olive oil

1 clove garlic                          smashed

1 Vidalia onion                      thinly sliced

1 bunch Swiss chard            stalks chopped and leaves sliced into thirds

6 dried apricots                     sliced

2-3 tbsp                                 white wine, stock or water

½ -1 tsp                                 kosher salt

Freshly ground pepper

¼ tsp                                      hot chili flakes  *optional

1 tbsp                                     pine nuts, toasted

Heat oil in a large frying pan at medium-high sauté garlic, onions and Swiss chard stalks until tender and golden, about 3 minutes. Add Swiss chard leaves, apricots and a tablespoon of wine, turn heat to high and cover pan immediately to wilt greens for 1 minute. Remove cover, toss greens with tongs add remaining wine, season with salt, ground pepper and chilli flakes, turning heat to medium and continue to cook until greens are tender. Serve garnished with pine nuts.

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